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20130101
20130131
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
. while egyptians are raising their voices two years after rising up against hosni mubarak, in syria, the defiance has not shifted president assad. homs has seen some of the worst fighting. our reporter has returned for this special report. >> some of the heaviest fighting happened here. this neighborhood came to symbolize a brutal conflict. a ferocious government offensive after the opposition, it was an assault on an entire community. after nearly one year, life is slowly returning. rubbish collectors are on the job. a small sign the government is back on the street. some families are starting to come home. how is life here, i asked. could not be better, he replied. he gives an anxious look at the soldiers escorting us. a repair shop is back in business. it is not much of a bicycle, but he makes it work. it is what life is like here. >> services are very good. before, life was more difficult. things are getting better day by day. >> it is still a fragile calm, but good enough for children to play on the street. even they do not take notice when guns go off in the distance. it is pa
in egypt led to the overthrow of hosni mubarak. what impact do you think these protests might have that we're seeing now? >> president morsi and the muslim brotherhood will be nervous about what they have seen today. it is important to say while there is disillusionment, things have not gone as people fought -- thought he debuts ago. the pace of change has not been great. we're talking about a split between the liberals and those in the support the brotherhood on the other. it is the liberals who are mainly taking to the streets today. two years ago, we saw all of egypt coming out onto the streets. another half is sitting at home saying there has been an election. our side won. why are you on the streets? the president says give me time. i have had seven months on the job. people say he has had time. they worry about the agenda being pushed. they do not want the state to be made at the beginning. what is difficult to see is how the two sites will be brought together. neither the authorities nor opposition have come up with a clear vision as to how to do that. >> thank you very much. while
of president hosni mubarak. jeffrey brown has our story. >> brown: political violence ravaged egypt for a fifth day after a weekend that saw more than 50 people killed. in cairo, protestors threw rocks and gasoline bombs at riot police. police in turn fired tear gas into the crowds who oppose president mohammed morsi and his islamist dominated government. >> what's happening here in the country is really shameful. destroying the city is not fair. but at the same time the way the police treat people makes tensions heavier because all decisions by morsi's government have been taken out of the public interest. >> brown: security officials said a man described as a by-stander was killed by a gunshot. it was unclear who fired it. and government tanks were on the streets in the cities of suez and port said. they enforced a curfew that an angry president morsi announced last night. >> to end the bloodshed, to maintain security against vandals and law breakers and for the protection of citizens, i have decided after referring to the constitution to announce the imposing of the state of emergency in por
helped topple president hosni mubarak. street battles with police broke out in cairo and elsewhere, and well more than 300 people were hurt. the protesters say the revolution was hijacked by islamists, who now control the government. thousands of anti-abortion protesters rallied in washington today against "roe versus wade." the supreme court decision that legalized abortion was handed down 40 years ago this week. this year's rally and march came in frigid temperatures. protesters carried signs and chanted slogans on the steps of the supreme court. abortion rights demonstrators staged a counter-demonstration there. republican senator saxby chambliss of georgia will not run for a third term in 2014. in a statement today, chambliss said, "this is about frustration." he said he's unhappy with president obama's direction and tired of partisan gridlock. chambliss had angered tea party forces when he supported tax increases as part of a plan to tame the federal deficit. wall street closed the week with another rally. the dow jones industrial average gained 70 points to close near 13,896.
anniversary of the uprising that toppled president hosni mubarak. france today declared success in its three-week military operation to rout islamist rebels in mali. malian forces liberated the towns of gao and timbuktu this week, and french troops now have occupied the airport at a third key city-- kidal. in paris today, the french defense minister said his government is open to having u.n. peacekeepers take over, with french support. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: and we turn to two stories about conflict in the middle east. as the battle in syria between president bashar al-assad's forces and the free syrian army or f.s.a. rages on, thousands of refugees flood into neighboring countries. jonathan miller of "independent television news" takes us to a secret crossing point on the border with jordan on the outskirts of the syrian city of da'-raa. >> reporter: katiba jaber is a lonely place, exposed to desert winds that chill you to the bone. the border guard is ready for what the night will bring. ( gunfire ) the shooting started shortly after sunset.
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)